library instruction

Infographic: Evaluating News Sources

A faculty member from OWU’s Education Department asked me to design an infographic to help her students evaluate news sources. We worked closely together on the content (she had specific websites in mind that she did NOT want her students to use). It was a surprisingly easy design experience and I think that had a lot to do with the open and honest input I got from my faculty member.

EvalNewsSites (1).png

Marketing The Library As An Experience

It was a whirlwind academic year. I don’t think I’ve ever been busier with classes, student appointments, marketing, and all the other joys of academic librarianship. Now that it’s over, I have set my sights set on our incoming freshmen class. Here at OWU we require incoming freshmen to attend one of three 2-day sessions we call StART (Student Advising, Registration, and Testing). It’s the first opportunity for many campus faculty and staff to interact with students in person (of course, I’ve already infiltrated their Facebook group *evil laugh*). StART attendees receive a folder that includes all sorts of checklists and helpful campus information. I’ve made some significant revisions to this year’s OWU Libraries informational handout.

It’s now a 4 page, 5.5 inch x 4.25 inch booklet. Portions of the layout and design were inspired by a booklet created for the Columbus Coffee Experience.

StARTCover (2)

This is the cover. The booklet will be tucked inside a folder full of other informational materials, so I wanted to be sure it was a) small enough to have to go in the front and b) had something interesting at the top that would make students want to read it.

StART2 (2)

This is page 2. I highlighted the most important services for students in the larger text and was able to feature all our campus libraries and some other key spaces and events in the smaller text. And, of course, I put our most valuable resource, our librarians, in red, all caps text.

Page 3 includes real student testimonials meant to showcase how each student can benefit from the library in a unique way – whether it’s from using resources, having access to scanners, or finding a quality study space.

The back cover promotes a photograph opportunity at the Libraries information table on the first day of each StART event.

The back cover encourages students to visit the Libraries information table on the first day of each StART event.

I’m pretty pleased with my work on this booklet. I designed it using Piktochart and had it printed by OWU’s own print services staff (who are amazing, by the way). I hope it will encourage OWU students to find their own space, librarian, and resources within the libraries.

High School Outreach Is Important…AND FUN!

Earlier this week, I had the privilege of meeting with AP Composition classes at a nearby high school. Interacting with high school students is an integral part of my work. Not only do I help the students themselves, but I also benefit from interacting with an age group that is so very similar to my own first year students.

I was asked to speak about the differences between high school and college research under the assumption that, as AP students, many of them would test out of first year composition. I wanted to tailor my presentation as much as possible to this particular group, so I asked them to answer a few questions using a Google form.

Google forms are gloriously easy to set up. Be sure to select Paragraph Text as the Question Type so responses can be as long as necessary.

Google forms are gloriously easy to set up. Be sure to select Paragraph Text as the Question Type so responses can be as long as necessary.

I didn’t want to use my session for search strategies or resources instruction (students would get that later from their own librarian). And rather than focus solely on library resources and college-level research, I wanted to address anxieties students might be feeling about college life in general. I saw patterns in their responses to my questions that made it easy to come up with content for my presentation.

My presentation consists of five slides. The first four address the questions I asked via the Google form and the last contains words of wisdom from OWU seniors and recent graduates.

For presentation mode, click here: https://magic.piktochart.com/output/5087713-olentangylibertyhs

To see it in presentation mode, click here:
https://magic.piktochart.com/output/5087713-olentangylibertyhs

This was my first time using Piktochart‘s presentation mode and, of course, I found it incredibly easy to work with. I started from a template, but did a lot of customization. I kept consistent design elements throughout (like font and color) which made the process much easier as I could focus on wording and layout.

If you’d like to know more about my presentation, please comment and I’ll happily elaborate.

LibGuides Are My Hero or I Honestly Cannot Make Things Easier For My Students

I got a last minute-ish request from one of my favorite faculty members to talk to his Shakespeare students about an upcoming assignment. They have to read a Shakespeare play on their own, then write a paper and present to the rest of the class.

I started the LibGuide for the class with my usual books/articles/other resources format, but quickly decided that I had a rare opportunity to match my LibGuide part for part to the assignment.

Here is an excerpt from the assignment sheet (pardon my notes):

zackassignment

A numbered list of the prof’s expectations for content. AMAZING, RIGHT?

In building my LibGuide, I tailored box titles to the assignment’s “ingredient list.” I couldn’t provide specific resource pathways for every single ingredient (specifically #4 & #7), but that’s the nature of the assignment.

I used the following box titles:

#1 Essential Play Information
#2 Conflict, Characters, Themes
#3 Career, Works (Themes Across Plays)
#5 Criticism
#6 The Play In Performance

I think I’ve made it clear enough that the students have no excuse when it comes to finding appropriate and authoritative resources. No more stabbing into the Google dark!

Finally, check out my visual for where to go to find Shakespeare reference and circulating books:

Why tell when you can show, amiright?

Why tell when you can show, amiright?

In class, I simply showed students how to get to the LibGuide and went through each piece. I also brought in a stack of books (they’re labeled as “I showed this in class” on the LibGuide) and reminded them how useful indexes can be.

Flipping Out

With all the talk about flipped classrooms it was inevitable that I’d eventually have to start paying attention. Over the summer, my colleagues and I have had various meetings related to library curriculum revision and, let me tell you, flipped classrooms have really come to the fore.

I’m quite excited about it and many of the faculty I’ve mentioned it to are on board.

The biggest flip push will take place in our freshmen composition course, English 105. We’ve been fortunate in that our 105 faculty often grant us the luxury of two or even three library sessions per semester and I think our move towards flipped lessons will be a great way to say “thank you” since they can ultimately result in us taking up less of their class time.

I’ve been creating learning objects that I plan to get to the students via class email, a LibGuide, or by asking faculty to add them to their teaching slides (if they use them).

Here’s one of my favorite learning object babies:

guysblogI used the Onion’s Statshots as inspiration for this learning object. I think humor in our type of instruction is absolutely essential in order to keep students’ attention. In this Library Statshot, I introduce website evaluation, author credentials, and relevancy.

 

Self-Discovery Layer

Summon is Library Google. That’s how I’ve referred to our discovery layer since we first implemented it. But after a stimulating journal club meeting I realize I’ve been going about it the wrong way.

Rather than lazily plunking Summon and Google into the same category and letting the students figure it out on their own, I should be using Google and Summon as a bridge into library research and resources. (Pardon me if this sounds like, “duh,” but I’ve been avoiding Summon in the classroom like the plague for reasons I won’t go into here.)

Google is simple. And we like that. Google usually gives us what we want within the first two pages of results (you know, because if it doesn’t we just do a different search). Thank you, Google, for about 469,000,000 results in 0.28 seconds, but what good are they if I can’t sort them in a way that’s meaningful to me?

Enter Summon. With its simple, Google-like search box that accepts searches like “why is global warming bad” and “rush limbaugh doesn’t believe in global warming” and its gracious offering of refinement options by Publication Date, Content Type, Subject Terms, and Language.

In the classroom, I’ll start where students are familiar (Google), blow their mind about how search engine results are ranked, and show them how their library makes research easier and results more relevant.

I’m growing as a librarian. Really!

 

Image

 

Image