Google

Infographic: Evaluating News Sources

A faculty member from OWU’s Education Department asked me to design an infographic to help her students evaluate news sources. We worked closely together on the content (she had specific websites in mind that she did NOT want her students to use). It was a surprisingly easy design experience and I think that had a lot to do with the open and honest input I got from my faculty member.

EvalNewsSites (1).png

Collect Success Stories To Fuel Word-of-Mouth Marketing

As part of our ongoing marketing campaign, we’ve begun collecting library success stories from our students, faculty, and staff. We hope to share these stories via social media, marketing materials, and our website. On our campus, I think it’s safe to say that most people think the library and librarians are extremely valuable resources, but I don’t know if it’s always easy to articulate why. By collecting anecdotal evidence, we’ll be better equipped to narrate our value and hopefully connect with those students and faculty who have not yet benefited from our services.

Here is the Google form I created to help OWU Libraries tell its story (it’s modeled after a form used by OhioLINK):

shareyourstory

We’ll share this form through our website, social media, and direct email communication with our users. In addition, librarians will add their own success stories so we can build a database of the good work we do every day.

High School Outreach Is Important…AND FUN!

Earlier this week, I had the privilege of meeting with AP Composition classes at a nearby high school. Interacting with high school students is an integral part of my work. Not only do I help the students themselves, but I also benefit from interacting with an age group that is so very similar to my own first year students.

I was asked to speak about the differences between high school and college research under the assumption that, as AP students, many of them would test out of first year composition. I wanted to tailor my presentation as much as possible to this particular group, so I asked them to answer a few questions using a Google form.

Google forms are gloriously easy to set up. Be sure to select Paragraph Text as the Question Type so responses can be as long as necessary.

Google forms are gloriously easy to set up. Be sure to select Paragraph Text as the Question Type so responses can be as long as necessary.

I didn’t want to use my session for search strategies or resources instruction (students would get that later from their own librarian). And rather than focus solely on library resources and college-level research, I wanted to address anxieties students might be feeling about college life in general. I saw patterns in their responses to my questions that made it easy to come up with content for my presentation.

My presentation consists of five slides. The first four address the questions I asked via the Google form and the last contains words of wisdom from OWU seniors and recent graduates.

For presentation mode, click here: https://magic.piktochart.com/output/5087713-olentangylibertyhs

To see it in presentation mode, click here:
https://magic.piktochart.com/output/5087713-olentangylibertyhs

This was my first time using Piktochart‘s presentation mode and, of course, I found it incredibly easy to work with. I started from a template, but did a lot of customization. I kept consistent design elements throughout (like font and color) which made the process much easier as I could focus on wording and layout.

If you’d like to know more about my presentation, please comment and I’ll happily elaborate.

Piktochart Has Changed My Life

Let it be known, I am obsessed with infographics. In a previous post, I showcased one of my infographic-style learning objects that I made using Microsoft Publisher and Paint. Using these tools for this purpose has been less than ideal and I’m often left wondering if there is an easier way.

Well, friends, there is and it’s called Piktochart.

In addition to being incredibly easy to use, it is chock full of design inspiration. I signed up quickly via Facebook and am working on a citation infographic which I promise to post here when it’s ready, but in the meantime check THIS OUT:

Why Google Drive

Sure, I have a few things to learn about layout and spacing, but I’d say I’m off to a darn good start.

Self-Discovery Layer

Summon is Library Google. That’s how I’ve referred to our discovery layer since we first implemented it. But after a stimulating journal club meeting I realize I’ve been going about it the wrong way.

Rather than lazily plunking Summon and Google into the same category and letting the students figure it out on their own, I should be using Google and Summon as a bridge into library research and resources. (Pardon me if this sounds like, “duh,” but I’ve been avoiding Summon in the classroom like the plague for reasons I won’t go into here.)

Google is simple. And we like that. Google usually gives us what we want within the first two pages of results (you know, because if it doesn’t we just do a different search). Thank you, Google, for about 469,000,000 results in 0.28 seconds, but what good are they if I can’t sort them in a way that’s meaningful to me?

Enter Summon. With its simple, Google-like search box that accepts searches like “why is global warming bad” and “rush limbaugh doesn’t believe in global warming” and its gracious offering of refinement options by Publication Date, Content Type, Subject Terms, and Language.

In the classroom, I’ll start where students are familiar (Google), blow their mind about how search engine results are ranked, and show them how their library makes research easier and results more relevant.

I’m growing as a librarian. Really!

 

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