library

Giant Jenga

Now that midterms have passed and the end of the semester is in sight, my students are entering their high-stress period. Stress-relieving activities have been the trend in libraries for a while now and OWU is no exception. I love to try to surprise my students with things they wouldn’t expect to see in a library. Enter Giant Jenga.

This is a fairly low budget project, but does take some time. I want to say it took me about a month to complete, but that’s because I could only devote a few hours a week to box assembly and decoration. If you have three or four people working on it, I think you can easily make it in 1 or 2 days.

Here’s what you’ll need:

Assemble the boxes and seal them with the clear tape. Then tape two boxes together. (If you can find boxes that are long and shaped like, well, Jenga pieces, you can avoid having to tape two boxes together like I did. But I feel like the doubled up boxes hold up better to game play – which, remember, involves the boxes crashing to the ground.)

Use your decorative duct tape to fancy up the game pieces any way you see fit. I did a border around the ends of each piece. Then paint whatever words you want on the sides of the pieces. I opted for the words “LIBRARY” and “JENGA.”

It’s best to set the game up on a carpeted area as the pieces make noise when they fall (which will be amplified on tile flooring).

My kids seem to love it! I hope it lasts through the end of the semester and have extra boxes on hand should some of the pieces get destroyed.

highgiantjenga

Look how high they got!

markwithjenga

Here’s our circulation manager Mark standing by Giant Jenga for scale.

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Facebook Rolled Out Reactions and I Won Wednesday

Yesterday Facebook rolled out its newest feature…reactions. In addition to liking posts, users now have the option to love, laugh, hate, and more. As I scrolled through my news feed, I saw a post from Radiolab that added headphones to the reaction faces and morphed them into an advertisement for their show. I was instantly inspired and made my own advertisement promoting librarian services as a way to ameliorate the emotions that users experience while going through the research process.

libraryreactions

I’m pretty proud of this one. Not only is it super timely, but it also hearkens back to Carol Kuhlthau’s Information Search Process. I shared the ad in an ACRL library marketing Facebook group and it’s already been adapted by a number of other libraries. And the post has nearly 200 likes!

 

Live @ The Library 2016

We are a few weeks away from Live @ The Library and I am so proud of my poster design for this year’s event:

Live@Library2016 (1)

I was inspired by Vanity Fair covers from the 1920s and did the character drawings myself.  I used ink pen and Prismacolor markers on mixed media paper, then cut the figures out and laid them on layered pieces of very old construction paper (which gave me the faded effect that I really adore). I uploaded my image into Piktochart and used the event logo I designed last year.

 

 

 

We Went Piktochart PRO!

OWU Libraries has Piktochart PRO status. This means no more Piktochart watermark, high resolution downloads, printer-friendly options, and access to a bunch of sweet templates. I’m going to go on a library/librarians/library services advertising binge (more to come on why later).

Librarians are soldiers on the front of information overload.

Librarians are soldiers on the front of information overload.

Piktochart Has Changed My Life

Let it be known, I am obsessed with infographics. In a previous post, I showcased one of my infographic-style learning objects that I made using Microsoft Publisher and Paint. Using these tools for this purpose has been less than ideal and I’m often left wondering if there is an easier way.

Well, friends, there is and it’s called Piktochart.

In addition to being incredibly easy to use, it is chock full of design inspiration. I signed up quickly via Facebook and am working on a citation infographic which I promise to post here when it’s ready, but in the meantime check THIS OUT:

Why Google Drive

Sure, I have a few things to learn about layout and spacing, but I’d say I’m off to a darn good start.